Is Your Data Safe With Spotify? The Streaming Giant Is Under The Spotlight

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Spotify is under fire again. The General Data Inspection Authority (GDPR) is investigating Spotify’s handling of consumer’s rights to access their data. After reporting $159 million in losses in Q1 2019, the tech giant seems to be facing more issues, including important concerns around data privacy.

The full report released by the GDPR highlights many interesting questions regarding Spotify’s use of your data:

  • The data authority is looking into how Spotify is providing data to customers. This is including which information is copied by Spotify, and how they are handling that information after collection
  • The GDPR has taken note of a number of complaints against Spotify. The complaints mostly regarding the applicable law to access pursuant of Article 15 of the General Data Protection Regulation
  • Under Article 15 of the new General Data Protection Regulation, users can get a copy of all raw data that a company holds about that user. Including any information about the sources and recipients of that data, the purpose and processing of that data, and information about the countries in which are storing that data, and for how long
  • The GDPR has chosen to review Spotify’s general routines when requesting access. This does not include any individual complaints towards them

Spotify’s Privacy Center

Is Your Data Safe With Spotify? The Streaming Giant Is Under The Spotlight

On Spotify’s Privacy Center, they make an effort to be as transparent as possible with their use of data:

“At Spotify, we want to give you the best possible experience. To do this we process some personal data about you to understand your listening habits and to develop the best service for you and all of our customers. But, be assured, your privacy and the security of your personal data are very important to us.”

However, Spotify isn’t the only company having issues with Article 15. Youtube, Netflix, Amazon Prime, Apple Music and many others have also received violations. The GDPR proves to be on the side of users, and protecting their data. After all, what do these companies have to hide?